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How to model a Fresnel lens in OpticStudio

This article provides a summary of the ideal and real Fresnel lens models available in OpticStudio.

Authored By: Sandrine Auriol

Published On: January 26, 2018


Contrast Loss Map in OpticStudio 17.5

Contrast Loss Map is a new feature in OpticStudio 17.5 that provides an easy way to understand how contrast varies or is lost in an optical system. It visualizes contrast loss for a specific frequency of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) as a distribution map across the exit pupil. Contrast Loss Map gives insight into how the MTF is degrading across the pupil. You can then use the data to determine what changes to make to your system to improve MTF. Contrast Loss Map plots the same contrast loss values that are calculated during Contrast Optimization, a new capability introduced in OpticStudio 17 that uses the Moore-Elliott method to optimize for MTF at least 30 times faster than traditional methods.

Authored By: Michael Cheng

Published On: November 17, 2017


Understanding Tangential/Sagittal in OpticStudio and How To Rotate Rays

This article explains:

  • Conventional Tangential and Sagittal planes
  • Tangential and Sagittal planes in OpticStudio
  • Rotation of Tangential and Sagittal planes
  • MTF responses to rotation

Authored By: Misato Hayashida

Published On: September 11, 2017


Rotation Matrix and Tilt About X/Y/Z in OpticStudio

In this article, we will discuss about rotation matrix and Tilt About X, Y, Z. And some related frequently asked questions.

Authored By: Michael Cheng & Michael Humphreys

Published On: August 2, 2017


NSC Angle of Incidence from Ray Database Viewer

This article shows the steps for calculating the AOI based on the LMN direction cosine of a ray and the Normal vector of the surface at the intersection point.  There is a provided ZPL macro will will automatically calculate this information for the user from a ZRD file loaded in a Ray Database Viewer.

Authored By: Michael Humphreys

Published On: February 14, 2017


Adjusting Relative Luminosity to Simulate the Visible Spectrum

Relative luminosity is very important in optical design. By defining appropriate weighting per the characteristics of the optical system, we can better model what we would expect to see. This article demonstrates a method of using wavelength weighting to model the relative luminosity of the visible spectrum as perceived by the human eye.

Authored By: Kayo Sugiyama, translated by Jade Aiona

Published On: May 5, 2017


Display Pupils on a Layout Plot

You can easily show the Entrance and Exit Pupils in both the LDE and Layout Plots by using dummy surfaces and pickups to show the location of the pupils without affecting the other surfaces in your sequential system.  This article walks through how to use ZPL Macro and Chief Ray Height thickness solves in the Lens Data Editor (LDE) as well as hiding dummy surfaces in a layout plot.

Authored By: Michael Humphreys

Published On: November 13, 2016


Using Diffractive Surfaces to Model Intraocular Lenses

This article will demonstrate how users can use the Binary 2 surface to model an intraocular lens. Throughout this article, we will go through a demonstrative design and outline many of the concepts, as well as tips and tricks, involved in designing intraocular lenses in OpticStudio.

Authored By: James E. Hernandez

Published On: August 19, 2016


How to Design A Catadioptric, Omnidirectional Sensor

This article walks through a deomsrative design of an omnidiriectional, catadioptric sensor in OpticStudio. Throughout the article, tips and tricks are presented to designers looking to model their own omnidirectional system.

Authored By: James E. Hernandez

Published On: August 19, 2016


Modeling Optics with Realistic Edge Apertures

OpticStudio 16 offers a comprehensive way to model realistic lens apertures with opto-mechanical semi-diameters. Three separate apertures (semi-diameter, chip zone, and mechanical semi-diameter) offer the ability to define a lens component the same way it is made.

Authored By: Thomas Aumeyr

Published On: April 15, 2016


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